State v. Flynn | MT Supreme Court DUI Case

State v. Flynn is a Montana Supreme Court decisions involving a DUI case. Specifically, the issue for the Court was whether the Deputy had particularized suspicion to stop Flynn’s vehicle. Particularized suspicion is an important concept in Montana DUI law, and something that I have discussed before on here.

A police officer must have a particularized suspicion in order to stop a vehicle in Montana. To show sufficient cause to stop a vehicle, the State must show 1) objective data from which an experienced officer can make certain inferences; and 2) a resulting suspicion that the occupant of the vehicle is or has been engaged in wrongdoing or was witness to criminal activity.

In Flynn’s case, the Deputy testified that he saw Flynn’s truck cross the fog line three separate times over the course of about .3 miles. The question in the case was whether this justified stopping his vehicle (a stop which resulted in a DUI arrest).

Flynn’s attorney made a number of arguments, one being that under State v. Lafferty, crossing the fog line does not justify a traffic stop. The Montana Supreme Court clarified that Lafferty stated that crossing the fog line was not illegal. But an officer does not need to witness illegal behavior to form a particularized suspicion.

The Court also noted that the particularized suspicion analysis must focus on what the officer knew at the time of the stop – and that he doesn’t need to consider every possible legitimate excuse a driver may have.

With these things in mind, the Court found that the officer did have a sufficient particularized suspicion to initiate the stop.

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